MAKING FABRIC SUSTAINABLE 

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What Makes us Special

Circular Economy

Diverting waste from landfill and having it repurposed back into design sustains true value. This is the most energy and resource saving solution, simply connecting a waste with a need. 

Impact Metrics

Your sustainability targets are important to us. Fabrics are weighed in by type and client, then all the relevant metrics are returned on the impact you have by working with us. 

Sustainability icon

Social Enterprise

 The Textile Review operates as a Social Enterprise. At least 50% of our profits are always fed back into positive impact.

Tailored Services

Our mission is purely to reduce textile waste, and we will do that however possible. Our services can be flexible and tailored to fit with your needs, making sustainability accessible for all.

Transparency

Trace where your fabrics go/where they've come from. We're building sustainability stories together! 

"it's a welcome partnership to ensure that we are doing everything we can to reduce our overall waste and re-purpose the material that's left." 

-Show Manager, Grand Designs Live 

Join the movement against single use

FABRIC RECLAIMING SERVICES

Have you ver considered that your waste could be of value elsewhere?  

Reclaiming and repurposing fabric significantly reduces its environmental damage. The Textile Review is the first of its kind - offering industries using fabric options to repurpose, reuse and to become part of the movement away from single use.  

Whether you have a regular need for collection or just a one off, or whatever in-between; we can tailor a service to make your fabric use kinder to planet and people. 

Folded fabric on shelves


  • If you have specific sustainability targets to meet, we can help prove you're achieving them with our impact metrics.
  • Repurposing is more sustainable than recycling. The energy and costs are minimal as we don't need to process the materials - keeping it simple and efficient and respecting the value of what already exists. 
  • Trace where your fabrics go/where they've come from as they're repurposed onward. You'll be free to use all this in your own media and marketing channels and spread the message of direct action for sustainability.
  • We are operating as a social enterprise. This means that at least 50% of all profits are returned into making positive impact. We believe that this is the future of business and by working with us you're encouraging that to come true.

RECLAIMED FABRIC SOURCING

Reclaimed fabric is the most sustainable fabric, simply because it already exists. 

There's a growing variety of reclaimed fabrics available to hire or to buy. 

Choose whether you need it permenantly or temporarily, below.

What makes us special

circular economy icon

Circular Economy

Diverting waste from landfill and having it repurposed back into design sustains true value. This is the most energy and resource saving solution, simply connecting a waste with a need. 

Impact Metrics

Your sustainability targets are important to us. Fabrics are weighed in by type and client, then all the relevant metrics are returned on the impact you have by working with us. 

Sustainability icon

Social Enterprise

 The Textile Review operates as a Social Enterprise. At least 50% of our profits are always fed back into positive impact.

Tailored Services

Our mission is purely to reduce textile waste, and we will do that however possible. Our services can be flexible and tailored to fit with your needs, making sustainability accessible for all.

Transparency

Trace where your fabrics go/where they've come from. We're building sustainability stories together! 

ABOUT

The Textile Review raises value and extends the life of fabrics recovered from any industry using them. Reclaiming and repurposing of textiles significantly reduces environmental damage of surplus and single use. We offer flexible and tailored opportunities to repurpose, re-use and become part of the movement toward sustainability.  

Why Repurpose Textiles?

The problem with fabric 

The Textiles industry is one of the biggest contributors to pollution on the planet. It’s up there with the likes of Oil. Most manmade fabrics, such as polyester and nylon, account for well over half of textiles produced worldwide - using synthetic chemicals, mostly based on petroleum.  

Natural fabrics like cotton on the other hand, can use up an extortionate amount of water; 1kg of cotton consumes around 15,000 L of water and accounts for 85% of natural fibres globally.

fabric

Our Story

 There's a huge problem with textile use in the live events industry. Great volumes of fabric form part of the structure and decor at temporary builds, too often used for a 3 day exhibition then sent to landfill. I noticed this mass of waste being created while working in the industry and it simply didn't make any sense. 

I was aware of how single use materials were damaging our environment, undervaluing natural resources, exploiting workers in the supply chain and just astonsihingly polluting. Alongside noticing where there was huge waste, I began to also notice where new is not necessary, and I felt compelled to create solutions in connecting the two. 

Since launching, the list of industries that share this problem has grown and grown. 


Our Solution  

Attitudes to fabric use need to change - which is why I have launched The Textile Review. Providing fabric repurposing solutions so that single-use-per-event can become a thing of the past. The Textile Review can preserve the value of our resources. 

The Textile Review collects fabric that would otherwise be thrown away, and makes it availble to those who do not necessarily need brand new.

  • The reclaiming services offer tailored, responsible ways for anyone with waste fabric to divert it from landfill. \
  • The Fabric Shop is where fabric is available to hire or buy. We've found that many people buying fabric only need it temporarily, then have no option to responsibly dispose of it. The hiring service keeps fabric in circulation, multiplying the mpact each tme. For those needing fabric for permenant product design can purchase fabric onlne by the metre.  

 

The Textile Review's vision is to create repurposing solutions for anyone using fabric, events and other industries will take responsibility for the resources they use, and fabric will be sustainable.


Katie Briggs

KATIE BRIGGS

Katie is the founder of The Textile Review. Working previously in events, the amount of waste she witnessed compelled her to create new solutions for the industry and others using fabric in temporary ways. Katie Is also available for workshops, leading topic/panel discussions and public speaking.

Client Stories


Our reclaim heros

Grand Designs Live 2019 London
Sleep and Eat 2018
Brand Licensing Europe 2018
Decorex International 2018

Ongoing Fabric Collections

About

This is a service for anyone who often has suprus fabrics, i.e fashion brands or event production companies. 

How it Works 

We'll send you bags to fill with your surplus fabrics and wait for you to tell us when they're ready to be picked up. We will then book you on one of our fortnightly collections, and bring you new bags to replace the ones we pick up.

Our collection days are normall 1st & 3rd thursdays of each month, 

If these don't suit you, you may request a one off pickup here

Thanks for booking your collection!

If you have any questions about the arrangements we're making to collect your unwanted fabrics, please don't hesitate to call the office on 01273 023223 or email katie@thetextilereview.com

Fabric Hire

This is where the magic really happens. By hiring fabric for your event or temporary build, you're keeping resources in circulation. Simply, each time the fabrics are re-used, the impact is multiplied 100%. Again and again.

We supply to any temporary use. For you, this might be exhibition displays, private parties and weddings, window dressing, theatre productions, festivals, photoshoots... Get in touch and we will make it work. Browse our reclaimed fabrics below.

If you're looking for something that's not here, please do let us know as we may be able to source it for you!

Arrange a call 
Heavy Cotton Rolled

Heavy Cotton Casement

- Flameproofed

Medium Cotton Casement  

- Flameproofed

Polyester

White Polyester

Flameproofed

White Cotton Muslin

White Cotton Muslin

- Flameproofed

Black Muslin

White Cotton Muslin

- Flameproofed

Mustard

Mustard cloth

- Flameproofed

- Limited Sizing

Not sure which fabric you want?

Get in touch and we'll help you choose a suitable fabric for your needs.

Arrange a call

BLOG

The Basics

The Textiles industry is one of the biggest contributors to pollution on the planet. It’s up there with the likes of Oil. Oil, of course, is what most of the synthetic fabrics are made of. Natural fibres aren’t so innocent either, using up an extortionate amount of water; 1kg of cotton consumes around 15,000 L of water.  

That wastewater is then contaminated; given the 8,000 different chemicals used in production. These substances are endangering wildlife and human communities worldwide. Alongside chemical pollution is the problem of microfibres. Solids from the processing of the fabrics get swept into waterways where they make their way into food chains.  

Textile Waste Pile

How much waste is there?

It is estimated that 1.7 million tonnes of textiles are consumed in the UK each year, around 1.5 million tonnes of this go to landfill, despite the fact that almost 100% of this is recyclable.  

These are statistics you may have come across in relation to the fashion industry. Our extremely quick use of garments is causing a real problem environmentally and socially, all over the world. This alarming issue has been brought to media attention a great deal recently. However, non-clothing textiles make up 19% of all bulky waste in the UK, this is not solely a fast fashion issue.  

I found my focus while working in events, the fabric being used in temporary decor simply isn’t being valued properly. This hidden waste horrified me to think of where else needs urgent attention.  

How do we Solve Textile Waste?

In order to solve textile waste problems and create sustainability, it would seem we need to decrease the demand pressure on the industry. Grinding to a halt certainly seems unrealistic. Slowing down, extending useful life, repurposing are far more viable steps in the right direction. And at the very least we need to put a stop to single-use.  

studio reclaimed fabric

A Circular Economy* model lends itself particularly to the types of materials that are able to hold their value over time and over several uses. This encourages the idea that the value of a material of any type after one use matches the need of another user. With this in mind, it’s possible that a great amount of new material procurement could be shifted toward a market for second use materials. The efficiency of circulating materials instead encourages decreased supply prices and, perhaps most importantly, eradicates the necessity for the current detrimental demand on natural resources and manufacture.  

A New Rulebook for the Industry

So we enforce a new set of rules: No single-use, fair pricing and transparent procurement all-round, some industries would be devastated. Unfortunately, change unfortunately can’t happen overnight. There’s so much potential for the industry to adapt with the education we now have about the damage that it’s currently doing. The Textile Review was launched having seen a big problem in the events industry – now a solution has been created and awareness is growing. 

sorting reclaimed textiles

The Textile Review now has the aim to significantly reduce single use of fabric, in any industry. Simply, to repurpose what can be repurposed, extending the useful life of precious materials. If your industry or an industry you’re aware of could make a change in the way it uses textiles, to better serve the planet and its people, please do get in touch and be part of the movement.  


*For those unfamiliar with the ideas related to Circular Economy, The Ellen McArther Foundation offers some fantastic online resources on how the system can radically change the current path of unnecessary environmental degradation.

Katie Briggs, Founder

About The Author

Katie is the founder of The Textile Review. Having worked in the events industry, the amount of waste she witnessed compelled her to create new solutions for the industry and others using fabric in temporary ways.

Heavy Cotton Rolled
Heavy Cotton Casement
Heavy Cotton Casement

White Heavy Cotton Casement

This fire retardent, heavy and durable cotton casement is durable and sturdy, itwas used once before in May 2019 at a well-known design exhibition.  

This heavy cotton is one of the largest fabrics available, at 2.5m wide and with 20m available. 

Price is per metre  

Need more of a feel for it? Order a sample pack to help you make your mind up!  

Please note: All fabrics have been previously used and may have signs of wear. Grading and descriptions have been provided to give as accurate an indication of flaws as possible, however, you may find imperfections that have not been specifically listed. If you have certain requirements, we are happy to help you choose the right fabric and avoid any disappointment.

BUY NOW

Why is textile waste a problem?

The textile industry is extremely polluting and exploitative, something really needs to change. Read our article on the subject written by founder Katie here

What is Meant by 'Circular Economy'

Circular Economy is the principle of resources being transitioned through numerous uses. The benefits include reducing the demand on earth's resources for virgin materials, decreases energy spend manufacturing new products or materials, and a more connected society that respects existing value. Read more from The Ellen McArthur Foundation on the concept here.

Do you stock fashion grade fabrics?

Yes, we reclaim from many different industries and the list is growing. If a fabric is of Fashion grade, it will say so in the product description.

Do you stock fire treated fabrics?

Many of the fabrics we reclaim have come from comercial events and have been treated with flame retardent solution. We do not treat them ourselves.

 If I buy Fabric from you and do not use it all/ no longer need it, can I send it back?

Yes, sure. However, please buy responsibly. Our fabrics are sold by the metre and the more this fabric is cut down, the less versatile it becomes for re-sale, and is less lkely to stay in circulation. 

Do you reclaim carpets?

Not yet, but get in touch as we know the people for that job!

Do you reclaim printed exhibition vinyls?

No, afraid not. This problem material we see so much single-use of doesn't fit with the business model of re-circulating. 

Please consider designing your prints to be used for more than one occasion, i.e do not print the year or location and re-use!

3 Things I've Learned So Far...

It’s been a week of reflection here. A big market research project has come to a close. I’m so excited to see what the next year reveals, opportunities are popping up all over the place, ready for me to get stuck into.  

I’ve learned so, so much over the past few months; assumptions have been turned on their heads, doubts have transformed into delightful affirmations. I’m on a good track here and it seems like the future has some really great possibilities in store.  

I wanted to share these 3 things that are really standing out for me upon reflection of the journey so far, in no particular order:  


1. People DO care

With little knowledge of the path ahead; I began a passion project with a big mission – to reduce textile waste in the events industry. I knew change needed to happen after witnessing first hand textile waste that the events industry produces and I had some ideas of how that could start. As I got going designing how the business would be structured, I constantly had this big looming dread about how I would get people to care enough about the issue at hand. I frustrated myself to no end over how I would come across, I didn’t want to nag or rattle anyones cage, I didn’t want to place blame and promote ugly guilt.  

I began meeting with people working in various areas of the events industry and while I was met with some resistance in the form of “it’s a big challenge for one little lady” and “I get it but our hands are too tied” – it really wasn’t all as bad as I’d speculated. Once I started speaking to the right people, those higher up in the authority of the industry such as venues and organisers, I was met with more “what a fantastic idea” and “thank goodness for people like you”. My goodness, people have just been so wonderfully welcoming and that really shines some vivid, optimistic light on the future. With this new support; my assumptions of what it is to rebel against convention are surely and definitely washing away with this uplifting momentum, which is great because it’s way more fun to be positive anyway.  


2. There is indeed definitely a need / I couldn’t stop now if I wanted to.

Testing the way that reclaiming textiles would work, I went along to shows just before they closed, caught up with the client and then when it was time, collected any fabrics that were not destined for further use. Decorex; the first show I did with event organisers UBM, blew my mind. I went home with a van full of white cotton, polyester and calico. I also got to chat with some interior design industry representatives who were exhibiting there, about working with second use materials. There seems to be a growing energy toward repurposing, which obviously I was delighted to find. I even sat with one exhibitor and designed lampshades made with the muslin used as ceilings for the exhibition spaces. At my third event (SLEEP + EAT Olympia London, also with UBM), I was interviewed by a sustainability auditor who was positively impressed and excitedly encouraged the work I’m doing. Each day I find myself even more stuck into this role and role I’ve created for myself and people have started looking to and relying on me, which brings me neatly to the next point.  


3. Direct Impact, Direct Impact, Direct Impact, Direct Impact. And simply to keep it up.

So far I’ve diverted over 200kg of fabric from a landfill destiny. Up until September, I had admittedly been treading fairly lightly, not knowing where I stood in terms of access to the problem. It quickly transpired with the revelation of how receptive people have been, that I could have access to a lot of reclaiming opportunity. Now I know I can make this a sustainable business, but more importantly – I can have a lot of direct impact.  

I recently attended an event on ‘circularity’ and community sharing, where a freestyle rapper spoke out along the lines of people not ‘walking the walk’. This is the exact sentiment that had really sunk in once I had physical, reclaimed fabric in my possession. I feel strongly now about just getting on with it. If you want to make a difference; start doing so in whatever way you can. It may feel minimal, but even the smallest of voices when speaking up together shout loud.  

So that’s where I am with The Textile Review right now. Making positive impact with some great people in the events industry and feeling very hopeful indeed about next steps; repurposing the fabric to responsible and sustainable onward use.  

Add your email address below to stay in touch with what happens next!

Need Some Help Getting Your Small Business Online?

Shorten your learning curve, make the most of your resources, an maximize your impact both online and off.

GET THE GUIDE

1 – Start with preparing a website strategy

Any successful small business website has one commonality: a well thought through strategy. With a plan in place, you’re teed off for success when it comes to supporting lead generation goals. Your website plan should answer the following ten questions:

  • Who is your audience?
  • What is your website’s goal or goals? (Rank and prioritize them!)
  • What functionality will your website have? (what’s critical and what’s a ‘nice to have’?)
  • What information do you need/want to give website visitors? 

2 – Set a clear page hierarchy

After you have developed the overall goals and a blueprint with tips on creating a website for your business, the next step is making it easy for website visitors to find content. To do this, make sure your page hierarchy is clear.

Social Media Today suggests bucketing your content by theme and importance. Try physically drawing a plan as you create a high-level outline. Most people freeze up at this point so it’s important to visualize your website structure!

3 – Keep it (so so) simple

Simple design and text are essential to an effective small business website. An overly complicated website doesn’t convert. Too many page elements lead to website visitor confusion.

So, long story short, uncluttered visuals and text have the most significant impact on your audience. And, while we’re on the subject of simplicity, keeping your color scheme minimal is key, too. Two to three colors is all you need to make an impact.

Be pragmatic in your color selection and fortify the use of white space within your small business website design. 

“This is not the time to show off your design acumen, with lots of distracting sounds and lights on the site and every icon known to web-kind,” says Nationwide.  

4 – Maintain well-defined calls to action

As a small business, you don’t need to be coy, Roy. Clearly state what you want people to do.

Use phrases like, “Subscribe to our newsletter,” “Book your reservation now” or “Email us for a free quote today.” After you identify your page structure, sketch out your content sections and maintain well-defined CTAs, then layer in conversion opportunities like pop-ups, alert bars, and more! Your lead forms should be prominent and enticing as well.

5 – Make your design responsive

Did you know 90% of small business websites don’t keep the smaller devices’ screen size in mind when creating websites? And around 30% of all website traffic is mobile. 

Before publishing anything on the web, always consider desktop and mobile devices. “Having a site that isn’t mobile optimized can drive away customers, hurt your SEO and look unprofessional,” notes Small Business Trends writer Ann Pilon. 

The finale: last tidbits on small business website tips

So there you have it… we hope these 5 tips for building an effective business website were consumable and prompt action as you embark on creating your small business website. 

About The Author

Madeline Carpenter is the founder of Market ‘Til You Make It. When she’s not serving her clients, she geeks out on board games, cider, and challenging her friends to top her awesome karaoke skills. She calls Bloomington, Minnesota home.

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